The Factory World by Joseph Edward Ryan

The Factory World is very similar to Stephen King’s Dark Tower series, Tad Williams’ Otherland series, or the screen adaptation of Mutant Chronicles. With dark and gritty tones, vivid and unsettling imagery, a mixture of science fiction, fantasy and horror elements and a milieu-based story structure, The Factory World draws inspiration from thirty years of slipstream cross-genre novels. Ten year…

Sephirot

by Gordon Bonnet   Our main character is Duncan Kyle, a man of indeterminate age or origin who one night falls through the floor of his apartment and finds himself in a dark and mysterious world, one of many within the Sephirot that he must journey through and return home. This is a standard Voyage and…

Kumari: Goddess of Gotham

by Amanda Lees. Amanda Lees parents met in the Borneo jungle where her Glaswegian-born mother had set up a hospital and her father was an Oxford-educated Gurkha officer. Goddess of Gotham was written as a tribute to her late mother, and to reflect Lee’s own exotic upbringing, exploring her love of the world and it’s different cultures. The first in…

A Game of Thrones by G.R.R. Martin

Martin crafts a complex and exhilarating story that leaves you breathless and yearning for more. A Game of Thrones (A Song of Ice and Fire Book One) was first published in 1996 to relative success, which was further boosted by HBO’s serialization of the novel onto television. Inspired by greats such as J.R.R. Tolkien, Robert…

Ad Infinitum by William Fripp

William Fripp has created a dark universe that blends the style of Stephen King with the cosmic nihilism of Lovecraft. The idea is intriguing and the imagery is superb. Fripp has written characters that are engaging and has crafted a villain that grips you by the throat and refuses to let you go until the book is…

The Time Traveller’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger

Audrey Niffenegger’s debut novel, The Time Traveler’s Wife, has sold nearly five million copies worldwide and has been translated into over thirty languages. But does this make it any good? The Time Traveller’s Wife is about a man with a genetic disorder that allows him to unpredictably travel through time, and the woman that eventually becomes his wife,…

Horus Rising by Dan Abnett

“It is the 31st millenium. Under the benevolent leadership of the Immortal Emporer the Imperium of Man has stretched out across the galaxy. It is a golden age of discovery and conquest. But now, on the eve of victory, the Emperor leaves the front lines, entrusting the great crusade to his favorite son, Horus. Promoted…

An Interview with Beth Webb.

After reading Foxdown Wood by Beth Webb I decided to contact her and talk to her about her book. She is a fascinating woman who is an artist, writes books for both adults and young adults and works with an organisation called Books Beyond Words, helping teens and adults with learning difficulties. On your website you mention…

Foxdown Wood by Beth Webb

Beth Webb is an accomplished author of children’s and young adult’s stories. Foxdown Wood (1997) is one of her earlier books, aimed at a younger audience. It has narrative similarities to works such as the Narnia chronicles or The Bridge to Teribithia, but rather then being derivative is actually a refreshingly original take on the ‘other…

The Cold Moons by Aeron Clement

Aeron Clement is a Welsh author who is known for his only published book, The Cold Moons. Very little is known about Clement – many websites incorrectly call him an American author, and he is often mistakenly called a science fiction writer. He was born in Swansea and had been a director of a civil…

The Alchemaster’s Apprentice by Walter Moers

Walter Moers is a German writer and artist. In 1999 the first of the Zamonia series was published in Germany, The 13½ Lives of Captain Bluebear, and was translated into English in 2000 for the UK and 2005 for America. It was an international bestseller (though it has retained some obscurity in the US.) The Alchemaster’s…

Raven, Swordsmistress of Chaos by Richard Kirk

Interestingly, Richard Kirk was actually a pseudonym for two writers – Angus Wells and Robert Holdstock. Both these writers have an impressive bibliography; Wells having a rich background in fantasy and westerns, and Holdstock with an even more impressive background in Celtic, Nordic and mythic fiction. It is not known which elements of the book either…